Teen Journalists: The Next Generation

We cover fashion, trends, and pop culture in the Nation's Capital and beyond.
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TEEN JOURNALISTS INTERVIEW CARL RAY

CELEBRITY MAKE-UP ARTIST

MRS. OBAMA’S PERSONAL MAKE-UP ARTIST

March 10, 2013 

Did you ever study make up?

 I have never formally studied make-up.  I am self-taught.

 What was your first job? 

I was a paper boy.  My first make-up job was working behind the counter at Blue Mercury.  It used to be called Effects.  I was the resident make-up artist.  Then, I found my way to George Salon where I have been the resident make-up artist for sixteen years.  I have had the honor to be the personal make-up artist for the First Lady and have been responsible for her make-up for her official appearances over the past three and half years.

What are some important beauty tips and products? 

Ultimately, skin is the most prominent feature so SPF, cleansing, moisturizing, exfoliating, taking your make-up off at night, drinking plenty of water, eating correctly, exercising are all important because all of those things have an impact on your skin.  After that, a good mascara and lip-gloss.

What do you think is enough make up to look cool but not too much that our moms won’t let us go out?

 That depends on the Mom and your definition of cool.

 Let’s say a Mom who is pretty conservative.

 I would say mascara, lip gloss and a tad of bronzer to perk the skin up.

 Are there any drug store make up products you use? Remember, we are 13. We are on kind of a tight budget.

I use a lot of drug store mascaras.  I also use drug store eyelashes.

 Are there any make up looks you wish would go away?

Too much cake foundation.  I like a natural look.  And too much eye-liner.

 Who are some celebrities whose make up you have done and is there anyone whose make up you wish you could do? 

Let me think.  Natalie Portman, Clare Danes, Kerri Washington, Anna Paquin, Claire Danes, Debra Messing, Katherine Heigl, The Gummer Girls (daughters of Meryl Streep), Alanis Morrisette, Christina Millian.  I did make up for the Duchess of York, Sarah Ferguson, Queen Noor, I just did Her Royal Highness Mette-Marit, The Crown Princess of Norway who was here to speak about HIV.

 I would love to do Madonna, Beyonce and Kate Moss.

 Do you see as many trends in make-up as you do in fashion?

 Trends change yearly.  This year, the look is very natural.  If you watched the Oscars, everyone on the red carpet looked almost bridal.  Even the hair. 

What advice would you have for young people who are interested in a career in make- up?

 Practice, do a lot of make-up.  The more you do, the more you learn.  You learn by your mistakes.  You learn what looks good and what doesn’t look good.  I used to do my mother’s make-up.  I’m a painter.  The brushes and the paint called to me to be a make-up artist because it’s hard to make a living being a painter! 

Jocelyn and Reilly thank Carl Ray very much for his time and valuable insights!

 

 

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TEEN JOURNALISTS INTERVIEW WILLIE AND TRUMAN MORRISON

THE MORRISON BROTHERS BAND

March 10, 2013 

Growing up in DC with a Dad who is a judge and a Mom who is a lawyer, how did you get into music?

Willie: From an early age, they would always take us to see live music.  My dad is a huge music fan. We would find all ages clubs, they would take us, we grew up on his favorite artists and we loved the live music atmosphere.

Truman: My dad is from a really musical family. His sisters are all really good singers.

Willie: As children of baby boomer parents, they had us doing a thousand different things some of which were piano and guitar lessons.

What is your first memory of music?

Truman: My uncle gave me a ukulele when I was four or five.  I was also attracted to drums and I wanted to play the drums from a young age so I was always banging on stuff.  But my parents thought that was too noisy so they got me a guitar.

Willie: I used to play the trumpet. That was an affair that lasted about two months.  Parents have to be so good about these instruments because they buy a trumpet or they buy a drum set which has got to be a thousand bucks.  Truman had a saxophone that he played and then he gave up.  Parents have got to be thinking, ‘Are you kidding me? I just spent a month’s salary on this!’ Eventually, we settled on playing guitar.  I wish I had settled on piano because I think it essential for song writing.

 Have you ever had stage fright?

 Willie: Yes, I have definitely had it.  When we were auditioning for Universal Records, I couldn’t get my breath on the way over there, I was so nervous.  I learned to breathe a lot and to get in the right mindset.

 Truman: Like anything else, when you first do it, it feels a little weird and uncomfortable putting yourself out there but eventually it becomes second nature. Practice is essential.

Have you ever fought over a girl?

 Willie: We were three years apart in school so that was just enough that it wasn’t an issue.

 Truman: Which is not to say we won’t in the future.

When you are on stage at the Grammys someday doing a big collaboration, with whom would you want to perform?

 Truman: We are big fans of the The Zac Brown Band so I would have to say them.

(Willie takes Truman’s phone and shows the Teen Journalists a picture of Truman and Zac on Zac’s tour bus playing guitar)

What have been some of your musical inspirations?

Willie: There is a guy named Citizen Cope who was a huge inspiration to us.  I used to take the sixth string off my guitar because he did. That was totally pointless.

How many albums have you done?

Truman: We have done two albums.  Our first album was Midnight in Virginia.  We wrote it at the end of high school and beginning of college and it came out in 2009.

Willie: We saw some success with that.  We had a song called, “Comin To Get Ya” that did really well.

Truman: That album garnered us a lot of fans and people following us so we said, “Let’s try another album.” 

Willie: The band got better and stronger and we kept writing.  The second album was called Shotgun Silhouette which came out in 2011.  Our next album, about which we are far and away most excited about, is coming out this June.

When can we catch your next show? 

It is a fundraiser at the Hamilton on April 12 for the SPDTC, an organization that helps train lawyers for poor people in the South.

 

Do you have advice for younger people starting out in the music business?

 

Truman: The music business takes determination and commitment.  It’s a lot of work and it’s hard to break into the industry.  In a way, we are lucky today because we have YouTube and there are so many ways to have people hear our music. But there is so much competition so you have to smart and savvy and committed to what you do.

 

Willie: Also, almost every time someone wins best new artist at the Grammys, they have already released a bunch of CDs that no one has ever heard and their brand new EP is one that is done by the record label. So, just because it doesn’t happen right away doesn’t mean it isn’t going to happen! Don’t be discouraged and stay focused on the music.

Jocelyn and Reilly thank the Morrison Brothers and look forward to seeing them backstage at the Grammys!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Source: teenjournalists)

TEEN JOURNALISTS INTERVIEW JULIA FARR

OWNER, JULIA FARR BOUTIQUE

Saturday, March 9, 2013

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You made a pretty drastic career change from practicing law to fashion. Why did you do this?

This was my lifetime dream. I grew up loving fashion and always pining for the perfect skating dress when I really didn’t even skate that well.  When I was four years old, I would lay out the outfit that I wanted to wear after my nap.  And as I got older, I realized that I loved dressing other women and helping them present themselves to make the best of who they are.

For years, it was a hobby and then it hit me that it was what I wanted to do all the time.  

Although, I loved practicing law and I am glad I did.  It taught me really important skills like reading, writing, speaking and thinking critically which are all things I need to do to run a small business.

How do you choose the designers you sell?

When I started, I filled the store with designers that I wore and saw in other boutiques.  Now, I buy from designers who work well for all my clients, who range in age from mid-twenties to mid-seventies.  I go to market in New York, I go to the designers show rooms and I pick and choose.  Right now, I have about sixteen to eighteen designers hanging in my store.  I like small designers.  They bring something different, they think creatively, they have a direct hand in the process and you are not going to find them in every other place.  I like to support small businesses because I am a small business.   

Name three essential wardrobe items.

A beautiful silk blouse which I notice both of you are wearing.  It is essential for when you sit and meet with people because everything is above the table interest, a trench coat or dress coat and a sheath dress.

Do you have a favorite sweater and favorite jean?

My favorite sweaters are by an Irish designer, Lucy Downes.  Her business is Sphere One. She makes beautiful cashmeres.  Joe Jeans are my favorite.  I wear my skinny straight leg every other day.

What are your first memories of fashion? One good and one bad.

When I was six I wanted these white fur lined go-go boot.  I got them for Christmas and I just loved them.  As you know, white patent go-go boots go with everything so I wore them with whatever I could.

I have a lot of bad fashion memories but one sticks out.  I went to Stone Ridge in high school and I did a semester exchange in California.  On the trip out there to meet the family, my mother made me wear a short sleeve seersucker suit.  All these California kids came out of their house in their cool jeans and t-shirts to greet me and I was standing in there in a brown seersucker suit with short hair.  I will never recover from that.  

Is there anyone “DC famous” who you wish would come into your store?

It would be really fun if Michelle Obama came into my store!

Has anything about the business surprised you?

Everything about the business has surprised me.  The seasonality surprised me. People go away all summer and no one shops.  This summer I am having trunk shows in Nantucket and other beach towns.  Just the time when it is slowest here, the Fall is shipping in and no one is here buying.  As a business owner, I had to learn to be strategic about that.

What advice do you have for young people interested in the fashion business?

Whatever your interest is, take a class, get a part time job, and see if the interest sticks. If something comes your way and you don’t know if you will like it, do it anyway! You don’t want to limit yourself in any area.  The more things you try, the more opportunity you will have to figure out what you love. And then what you want to do with your life is do what you love.  And then it will feel like it is not working!

Jocelyn and Reilly love Julia’s boutique and thank her for her guidance!

 

 

 

 

(Source: teenjournalists)

TEEN JOURNALISTS INTERVIEW KATE BENNETT, FASHION EDITOR AT WASHINGTONIAN MAGAZINE
March 3, 2013
What fashion trend from your youth would you bring back?
Not many from the 80s or 90s. The era that I really like is the 70s and that is coming back.  I love the tailored high-waisted trousers with wide leg and the fedora hat.  The Bianca Jagger chic look.     
How do you decide each season which trends you are going to promote in the magazine?
I look at Fashion Week and what people are talking about and then I try to translate what’s happening in the fashion world for our market here in Washington.  This can be tricky because what is on trend in Paris, New York and Milan may not play so well here.  So I select specific outfits, clothes and concepts for my audience who is fashion savvy but not super-edgy.
Shoe styles seem to change every few minutes!  What is hot this year?
Pointy-toe and stilettos.  The giant platform that we have been seeing —which I love because I’m short —is kind of on the way out.  People are going back to the classic pump.   I just broke out a pair of Manolo Blahnik that I have had for ten years and had them repaired because they’re back in style. 
Do you have any favorite designers?
I have a lot of favorite designers.   Fashion is like art, so from an admiration standpoint, I appreciate the big, talented houses like Balenciaga, Valentino and Yves Saint Laurent.  I like to look at them.  
Personally, I wear a lot of Helmut Lang, Elizabeth and James and The Row.  I gravitate towards simple cuts, both modern and classic but with an edge, I shop at Zara, Intermix, H and M and Neiman-Marcus.  I’m across the board.
 What is the brand and style of your everyday purse? What about your evening bag?
My day-time bag is the TRT: Tiffany Reversible Tote from Tiffany and Co.  The jeweler also designs bags.  I have it in black and it’s reversible from suede to shiny leather.  Evening is a Tory Burch gold clutch.
When did you first start noticing fashion? Can you recall any early impressions?
My parents are very fashionable.  When I was your age, my Mom would wear Armani jackets with no shirts under them and slacks.  I was mortified at the time, but as I got older, I realized what fabulous style she had and still does.
 If you were not a fashion journalist, what would you be?
I would still be a journalist because I am a storyteller.  I like to meet people and tell their stories whether through their clothes, their jobs, their food or whatever reveals them.
 Although, when Silence of the Lambs came out, I thought I wanted to be an FBI agent.  I always felt like I would be the swanky, cool detective lady in a pantsuit.
What advice would you give young women as they try to find their personal style?
Listen to what you feel good wearing.  That should ultimately be the base of your style.  Limit trends—think about them—but think about who you are.  The best thing anyone can wear is confidence!
Jocelyn and Reilly thank Kate for being our very first interview and we love your advice!

TEEN JOURNALISTS INTERVIEW KATE BENNETT, FASHION EDITOR AT WASHINGTONIAN MAGAZINE

March 3, 2013

What fashion trend from your youth would you bring back?

Not many from the 80s or 90s. The era that I really like is the 70s and that is coming back.  I love the tailored high-waisted trousers with wide leg and the fedora hat.  The Bianca Jagger chic look.     

How do you decide each season which trends you are going to promote in the magazine?

I look at Fashion Week and what people are talking about and then I try to translate what’s happening in the fashion world for our market here in Washington.  This can be tricky because what is on trend in Paris, New York and Milan may not play so well here.  So I select specific outfits, clothes and concepts for my audience who is fashion savvy but not super-edgy.

Shoe styles seem to change every few minutes!  What is hot this year?

Pointy-toe and stilettos.  The giant platform that we have been seeing —which I love because I’m short —is kind of on the way out.  People are going back to the classic pump.   I just broke out a pair of Manolo Blahnik that I have had for ten years and had them repaired because they’re back in style. 

Do you have any favorite designers?

I have a lot of favorite designers.   Fashion is like art, so from an admiration standpoint, I appreciate the big, talented houses like Balenciaga, Valentino and Yves Saint Laurent.  I like to look at them.  

Personally, I wear a lot of Helmut Lang, Elizabeth and James and The Row.  I gravitate towards simple cuts, both modern and classic but with an edge, I shop at Zara, Intermix, H and M and Neiman-Marcus.  I’m across the board.

 What is the brand and style of your everyday purse? What about your evening bag?

My day-time bag is the TRT: Tiffany Reversible Tote from Tiffany and Co.  The jeweler also designs bags.  I have it in black and it’s reversible from suede to shiny leather.  Evening is a Tory Burch gold clutch.

When did you first start noticing fashion? Can you recall any early impressions?

My parents are very fashionable.  When I was your age, my Mom would wear Armani jackets with no shirts under them and slacks.  I was mortified at the time, but as I got older, I realized what fabulous style she had and still does.

 If you were not a fashion journalist, what would you be?

I would still be a journalist because I am a storyteller.  I like to meet people and tell their stories whether through their clothes, their jobs, their food or whatever reveals them.

 Although, when Silence of the Lambs came out, I thought I wanted to be an FBI agent.  I always felt like I would be the swanky, cool detective lady in a pantsuit.

What advice would you give young women as they try to find their personal style?

Listen to what you feel good wearing.  That should ultimately be the base of your style.  Limit trends—think about them—but think about who you are.  The best thing anyone can wear is confidence!

Jocelyn and Reilly thank Kate for being our very first interview and we love your advice!

(Source: teenjournalists)